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It’s also very tempting to “over-tweak” your basal profile just because you can. A basal profile can become very complicated, with multiple peaks and valleys, but that is not how a non-diabetic pancreas secretes insulin. Keep your basal profile as simple as possible.

There are two great books that cover this (and a lot more) in greater detail, “ Think Like a Pancreas ” by Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, and “ Pumping Insulin ” by John Walsh, P.A. Ruth Roberts, M.A.

I’m sure there are others as well, and I’d love to hear about them – leave a comment if there’s a favorite book or resource of yours that I don’t know about.

This is an area that I’m not very familiar with. I’ve been using an insulin pump for way too long (I started in the mid-to-late 1990’s). In fact, I’d have to do some research to even tell you what all of the current long-acting insulins are today.

That being said, much of what we’ve covered here does still apply to you. If you present all of the data and information you’ve collected to your diabetes care team they might give you a big kiss! Making adjustments will be much easier for them with so much information to work from.

Another great resource that I feel confident in recommending is “ Think Like a Pancreas ” by Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE. Make sure you get the latest version, 2nd edition (pictured here). There is an entire section in chapter six about fine-tuning injected basal doses.

Here’s a secret… looks like there are some shortcuts the pumpers don’t get to take. Shhhh! Don’t tell them that!

Think like a pancreas

For most people, basal insulin makes up about 40-60 percent of their daily insulin needs. Though if you eat a lot of carbs you’ll have a lower percent as basal, and if you eat very few carbs will have a higher percent as basal.

But remember, you are not “most people.” You know yourself best, and if your data backs up the need for something outside of the norm, then, by all means, do what you need to do.

We’ve added some cool things to the Logbook that we think will help:

I’m also a huge fan of the BG Reminders. When I’m supposed to test so often it’s very easy to lose track of time and forget. Having reminders is a big help. You can use a traditional timer or alarm clock for this part, but it’s much less fun.

Having your basal insulin programmed properly will give you a foundation of stone rather than sand. You’ll easily spot problems with your meal or correction insulin that may have been camouflaged before, and you’ll be able to get those fixed, too. You’ll sleep better knowing your blood sugar should stay right where it belongs (most of the time), and you’ll have a confidence that you may not have felt before.

If boats are sold out due to high demand this Spring, please check out our Harbor Tour at nike blazer outfit men

Fort Sumter Tours is an authorized National Park Service concessioner. We provide the only commercial boat transportation to Fort Sumter. We offer many departure times daily from two convenient locations, Liberty Square, downtown Charleston, or Patriots Point, in Mt. Pleasant.

Once aboard, you will experience a relaxing 30 minute narrated cruise to historic Fort Sumter. You will learn about the events which led to the outbreak of America’s most bloody war. When you arrive you will be greeted by National Park Service Rangers, who will provide further details about Fort Sumter and its pivotal role in the American Civil War. On the fort you will find a very informative museum ( 360 Video of Museum ) with many historic artifacts and a souvenir shop. After your roughly one hour visit, you will enjoy a scenic cruise back to your departure point.

Want to stay longer? Please ask the ticket window representative about an extended stay!

Please note, boats will depart promptly!

*Rates are subject to availability and change without notice. The Interagency Senior Pass does not apply to the ferry fee. This tour is great rain or shine. The Fort Tour has limited accessibility for the disabled and those with mobility issues. Please note: there is no Elevator Service at Fort Sumter – the museum, restrooms, bookstore and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. There are restrooms available at Fort Sumter. In addition, there are restrooms available on the ferry boats provided by Fort Sumter Tours.

Please note:

The tour boats are equipped with an elevator/lift and handicapped accessible restrooms. The boarding ramp can accommodate electric manual wheelchairs and scooters except in extreme tide situations. Although the restrooms on Fort Sumter are accessible only by climbing a flight of stairs the tour boat remains at the Fort so that restrooms on the boat are available during your visit.

**Please note the Fort Sumter Tour is a boat excursion dependent on changing weather and tide conditions, Fort Sumter Tours cannot and does not guarantee accessibility. Please call 843-722-2628 the day of your tour to verify accessibility. Note: No concealed weapons are allowed on any of the vessels that Fort Sumter Tours operates.

Returns the specified number of rows (search results) as columns (list of field values), such that each search row becomes a column.

transpose [int] [column_name=<string>] [header_field=<field>] [include_empty=<bool>]

None.

When you use the transpose command the field names used in the output are based on the arguments that you use with the command. By default the field names are: column , row1 , row2 , and so forth.

Use the default settings for the transpose command to transpose the results of a chart command.

... | chart count BY host error_code | transpose

Count the number of events by sourcetype and display the sourcetypes with the highest count first.

index=_internal | stats count by sourcetype | sort -count

Use the transpose command to convert the rows to columns and show the source types with the 3 highest counts.

index=_internal | stats count by sourcetype | sort -count | transpose 3

Search all successful events and count the number of views, the number of times items were added to the cart, and the number of purchases.

sourcetype=access_* status=200 | stats count AS views count(eval(action="addtocart")) AS addtocart count(eval(action="purchase")) AS purchases

This search produces a single row of data.

When you switch to the Visualization tab, the data displays a chart with the "34282 views" as the X axis label and two columns, one for "addtocart "and one for "purchases". Because the information about the views is placed on the X axis, this chart is confusing.

If you change to a pie chart, you see only the "views".

Use the transpose command to convert the columns of the single row into multiple rows.

sourcetype=access_* status=200 | stats count AS views count(eval(action="addtocart")) AS addtocart count(eval(action="purchase")) AS purchases | transpose

Now these rows can be displayed in a column or pie chart where you can compare the counts.

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Have questions? Visit Splunk Answers and see what air jordan iii retro infrared 23
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This documentation applies to the following versions of Splunk ® Enterprise: 6.0, 6.0.1, 6.0.2, 6.0.3, 6.0.4, 6.0.5, 6.0.6, 6.0.7, 6.0.8, 6.0.9, 6.0.10, 6.0.11, 6.0.12, 6.0.13, 6.0.14, 6.1, 6.1.1, 6.1.2, 6.1.3, 6.1.4, 6.1.5, 6.1.6, 6.1.7, 6.1.8, 6.1.9, 6.1.10, 6.1.11, 6.1.12, 6.1.13, 6.2.0, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.5, 6.2.6, 6.2.7, 6.2.8, 6.2.9, 6.2.10, 6.2.11, 6.2.12, 6.2.13, 6.2.14, 6.3.0, 6.3.1, 6.3.2, 6.3.3, 6.3.4, 6.3.5, 6.3.6, 6.3.7, 6.3.8, 6.3.9, 6.3.10, 6.3.11, 6.3.12, 6.3.13, 6.4.0, 6.4.1, 6.4.2, 6.4.3, 6.4.4, 6.4.5, 6.4.6, 6.4.7, 6.4.8, 6.4.9, 6.4.10, 6.5.0, 6.5.1, 6.5.1612 (Splunk Cloud only), 6.5.2, 6.5.3, 6.5.4, 6.5.5, 6.5.6, 6.5.7, 6.5.8, 6.6.0, 6.6.1, 6.6.2, 6.6.3, 6.6.4, 6.6.5, 6.6.6, 7.0.0, 7.0.1, 7.0.2, 7.0.3

Curious visitors who turn left off the Harvard Art Museums’ elevators on the building’s fourth floor are greeted by the Forbes Pigment Collection, a floor-to-ceiling wall of color compiled from about 1910 to 1944 by the former director of the Fogg Museum.

Stephanie Mitchell, Harvard Staff Photographer

By Colleen Walsh Harvard Staff Writer

Colleen Walsh

Date

As brilliant as any of the works in the Harvard Art Museums ’ galleries is a rainbow of small glass jars on the building’s fourth floor.

Curious visitors who turn left exiting the museums’ elevators will see the Forbes Pigment Collection, a floor-to-ceiling wall of color compiled between about 1910 and 1944 by the director of the Fogg Art Museum.

“In thinking about the role of a university museum, he was the first to conceive of it as ‘a laboratory for the fine arts,’ ” noted research curator Francesca Bewer in her book “A Laboratory for Art: Harvard’s Fogg Museum and the Emergence of Conservation in America, 1900–1950.”

Edward Forbes’ fascination with a painting’s colors and their binding medium — a close inspection of which could help to determine a work’s authenticity — fueled his desire to use science to understand and study great works of art. He is often cited as the father of the field of art conservation in the United States.

By the 1920s, Forbes had amassed containers of deep blues, rich purples, vibrant yellows, and myriad other colors from his travels to Europe and the Far East. Through the years, word of mouth helped the collection to grow as other art lovers and experts donated their own pigments. The museums’ collection, which is continually added to, now contains more than 2,500 samples and is renowned in the art community. For years, the pigments have helped art experts to research and authenticate paintings. Samples from the collection have been sent to the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Library of Congress, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, and the National Research Laboratory for Conservation of New Delhi, India.

In Cambridge, Forbes’ legacy thrives in the museums’ Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, where experts preserve masterworks for future generations and decipher the chemical makeup of paint and pottery glaze. In addition to being their own artworks, Forbes’ pigments are a window to the past, shedding light on the working methods and preferred materials of renowned artists. Studying the pigments also reveals the effort it took, in the days before synthetic pigments, to get colors just right.

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